Lenin Monument

 formerly on Aleje RóżKrakowPoland, Nowa Huta   

As an avid cyclist it is distinctly possible that during his two year sojourn in Kraków Lenin may have visited the area upon which Nowa Huta would later be built. He would make a high-profile postmortem return in 1954 when the Steelworks were named after him, and a year later his statue was unveiled in Strzelecki Park. The figure was moved to the Lenin Museum soon after, and later mysteriously disappeared. In 1970 the decision was taken to construct a new one on Al. Róż, with Marian Konieczny winning the commission.

Strangely, the artist was at that time living in Lenin’s former flat. Perhaps inspired by this freaky turn of fate Konieczny took three years to create the stunning seven tonne statue of Lenin striding purposefully forward down the district's main road with his raincoat open and brow furrowed. The people of Nowa Huta, however, were unimpressed, and the statue soon became the focus of creative vandals. In one such case a rusty old bicycle, battered pair of boots and a handwritten note were left below the statue which read, "Take these old boots, get on the bike and get the hell out of Nowa Huta." In 1979 a bomb was planted at his feet, though the only casualty proved to be a local man who died of shock after being awoken by the blast. During the Martial Law era more attempts to destroy Lenin's statue were thwarted, and it doggedly survived an effort to pull it down, as well as an arson attack. Finally, on December 10, 1989, Lenin was picked up by a giant crane, boxed up and left to rot in a disused fort, until a Swedish philanthropist bought the monument for 100,000 Swedish crowns, and had it shipped to a museum outside of Stockholm.

In 2014, as part of the ArtBoom festival, a mock-up of the striding Lenin monument was again erected on Roses Avenue, with a few key differences: this one was a miniature neon yellow fountain of Lenin urinating. The locals were outraged and it soon got moved to the Łaźnia Nowa Theatre, before disappearing completely. For more photographs and an overall look at life in the city under Lenin's gaze, visit the PRL Museum.


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@Editor IYP - Dang! Too bad. Thanks so much for checking on it though. If you get an update I'd love to hear about it. And thank you for the guides! They've been very helpful during our travels. The Krakow one is particularly packed with excellent overlooked sights!
Editor IYP
Hi Joel, We tried to find out, but failed to track down any leads. Seems it has disappeared forever.

It looks like it's not at Łaźnia Nowa Theatre anymore. Any idea where it went?
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