Czech Republic

Twelve Czech wonders of the world

more than a year ago

The Czech UNESCO heritage is an association of districts and town in the Czech Republic, whose territory contains monuments entered in the UNESCO World Cultural and Natural Heritage List.

By attributing the UNESCO symbol to a site, the entire world community is announcing: "Yes, this is something that is exceptional and unique in the world; it's something that we undertake to protect for each other and in the interest of us all - the nations of the world."

In 1991 Czechoslovakia ratified the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage and since then a total of twelve sites in the Czech Republic have been inscribed in the World Heritage List. We can therefore proudly announce the Czech Republic to be a "UNESCO superpower". We should add that UNESCO is the abbreviation of United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

Brno 

Brno is an important urban monument reservation and the second largest city in the Czech Republic. There has been continuous settlement here since the arrival of the Slavs in the 6th century, through the period of the Great Moravian Empire, and to the present day. Since the end of the 13th century the city has been protected by the Špilberk Castle, which over time became the seat of the Moravian Margraves from the Luxembourg family and the Moravian regional capital. As with other cities, Brno has hidden secrets, for example the underground catacombs. For tourists from all over the world the greatest attraction is the Tugendhat Villa, which is the architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's most important European work, which was inscribed in the UNESCO List in 2001.

Český Krumlov

In the southernmost part of the Czech Republic there is a region which is an ideal place to experience some highly interesting adventures. Its centre is the town of Český Krumlov which, although not large in size, is all the more attractive due to its bewitching atmosphere that harks back to ancient times. Thanks to its unique medieval buildings it has been rightly protected by UNESCO since 1992. As a natural centre it is vibrant not only with history, as over time it has become a city of culture, art and remarkable experiences, and offers up tidbits from its varied menu of cultural events, ranging from visits to museums and galleries to concerts at any of the seven musical festivals or performances laid on as part of the traditional celebrations or special night tours, to events held in the stylish inns. Surrounded by unspoiled natural beauty it attracts all those who want to have an unforgettable, unusual and fascinating time.

Holašovice

The village was first mentioned in the mid-13th century during the period of the colonising movements in the South Bohemian border region. The town has experienced two crippling blows over the years. The first was in the 16th century, when almost all of the original Czech inhabitants of the village were wiped out through plague, following which it was almost immediately occupied by German settlers. The Second World War dealt another blow when the attempts made by the German inhabitants to join the village to the Reich were successful. After the war, in 1946, the enforced withdrawal began which affected the majority of the German inhabitants. The empty buildings were then inhabited by Czechs from the inland, who built very little here, with just some repairs and maintenance being carried out. This meant that in 1998 the almost entirely preserved medieval system of houses and grain stores was inscribed in the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage List.

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