Wroclaw

Wrocław By Car

share
Poland is one of Europe’s leading nations in road fatalities, a statistic that will surprise few who have had the pleasure of using the roads here. A lethal combination of poor road surfaces, networks unsuited to the volume of different traffic, and, most of all, aggressive driver behaviour result in the common sight of mangled wrecks around the country. Exercise caution, keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front, rub those rosary beads, and God speed.

The speed limit in Poland is generally 50km/hr in cities (60km/hr between 23:00 and 05:00), 90km/hr outside urban areas, 120km/hr on dual carriageways, and 140km/hr on motorways. All cars must have their headlights switched on at all times and carry a red warning triangle, first aid kit, replacement bulbs, a national identity sticker, and proper registration and insurance documents. Poland also has strict drunk-driving laws: 0.2‰ is the maximum blood/alcohol limit, so forget about having even a single beer. EU citizens may use their home driving licences as long as they are valid (and you have it on you when driving), however citizens of countries that didn't ratify the Vienna Convention (tsk, tsk, Australia and America) will find their licences technically invalid (though this has never been a problem for anyone we know).

One of the only major highways in the country, the A4 connects Wrocław with Berlin (via Legnica) and Kraków (via Opole and Katowice). Much of Wrocław’s centre is pedestrianised, meanwhile one-way and seemingly accessible streets that are actually only available to permit holders make driving in the centre an absolute nightmare. Poor planning and limited traffic patterns mean congestion is a major, major problem as well; call a cab and it might take as much as twenty minutes to get to you, though it's only a few blocks away. As such, we suggest you ditch your vehicle at the first opportunity, which raises the question of where to put it.

Free parking is basically non-existent, though some hotels have limited parking spaces; check when booking your room. For street parking you'll easily recognise the universal large blue 'P' sign, but be aware that a blue circle with a red 'X' over it means 'No Parking' (not sure which universe that sign is from). Pay via the automated ticket machines; in the city centre it's 3zł for the first hour, 3.60zł for the second hour, and 4.30zł for the third. Thereafter you’ll be forking out 3zł an hour.
Read more

Refine your search

Choose Categories
Show all categories
By Plane
By Train
By Bus
By Car
Choose Categories
By Plane
By Train
By Bus
By Car
Choose District
Show all
Centennial Hall & Surrounds
Old Town
Południe
Choose District
Centennial Hall & Surrounds
Old Town
Południe
Choose Amenities
Show all
Facilities for disabled
Choose Amenities
Facilities for disabled
Submit
Put our app in your pocket

Poland shop
This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more here. AGREE
Top