Tirana

Arrival & Transport

Arrival & Transport

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Getting to Albania has never been this easy, with affordable links via land, sea and air. Once you've arrived, keep in mind that as long as you’re on the ground it’s going to be a bumpy ride, whether you take a taxi, bus, car or train.

Arriving in Tirana

Tirana remains the last major city in the known universe without a bus or train station.

Public transport

Tirana’s ageing fleet of conked-out buses plies a total of 12 routes in a cloud of oily smoke between about 05:00 and 22:00. Get on, pay the conductor 40 lek and away you go. It’s unlikely you’ll ever have to wait more than 10 minutes to travel on one, so at these prices and at this frequency it would be somewhat impolite to complain. The city centre is so compact that the need to use public transport won’t happen very often. All buses are marked with their destinations, making them relatively easy to use.

Taxis

Taxis are a useful form of transport in Tirana, and, after 22:00, if you’re too tipsy to walk or confidently operate a bicycle, they’re the only game in town. Several companies use meters and can print receipts if necessary. Our experience is that drivers don’t have to be reminded to use them. Rates start at 300 lek for the first 2km (sufficient for most city centre trips) and 95 lek/km after that. Between 22:00 and 07:00 the aforementioned start rate rises to 350 lek. Few drivers speak English, so it’s a good idea to write down the address, or to telephone someone who can explain.

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